People on twitter: ” Rupert hasn’t done anything since HP ended.” “Where is Rupert.”

Reblog - Posted 12 hours ago with 30 notes

Broderick, Lane rule Broadway again with ‘It’s Only a Play’
The boys still have it!
Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane, starring this fall in Terrence McNally’s “It’s Only a Play,” are still box office gold.
The revival, which opens Oct. 9, has already raked in $5.5 million — the top earner, so far, of the fall. The production teams Broderick and Lane for the first time since 2005, when they headlined a feeble revival of Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple.”
They were Broadway’s reigning couple in 2001 in Mel Brooks’ smash “The Producers.” The day the show opened, the box office sold $3 million in tickets, a record that stood for two years until they rejoined the show in 2003 — and sold $3.5 million in a single day.
That $5.5 million is quite a haul for a non-musical, making Broderick and Lane members of a select club of performers whose names can sell out a show before opening night — Denzel Washington (“A Raisin in the Sun”), Daniel Craig (“Betrayal”), Julia Roberts (“Three Days of Rain”) and Hugh Jackman (“Back on Broadway”).
Jackman, by the way, has yet to hit Broderick-Lane levels with his show, “The River.” But it’s in a smaller theater (Circle in the Square) and the play, a London import, is obscure. Jackman will no doubt set box office records of his own once the season comes into sharper focus. He always does.
Jack O’Brien, who’s directing “It’s Only a Play,” has assembled an impressive group around Broderick and Lane. Megan Mullally plays a novice producer, eagerly awaiting the reviews of her first show. Stockard Channing plays the nutty diva. And F. Murray Abraham plays a waspish critic, modeled, some think, on John Simon.
Broderick is the playwright, and Lane plays his best friend, a bitchy TV star who has pointed words for, as Elaine Stritch used to say, “the theater and the charming people in it.”
“It’s Only a Play” premiered in 1982, so only a handful of people today would get all the many jabs at the theater people of the time. That’s why McNally spent the spring updating the script, adding what my sources say are “sharp and hilarious” pokes at the current crop of theater muckety-mucks. His targets this time include Harvey Fierstein, Jujamcyn chief Jordan Roth and his mother, Daryl (a producer), Rosie O’Donnell and Big Ben Brantley.
Yours truly comes in for a fair share of cracks, I’m told — most of them delivered by Lane, who even ad-libbed a few at a recent table reading.
It brings back fond memories of the e-mail exchanges we had when I had a go at “The Addams Family” during its out-of-town tryout. Lane responded: “Larry Gelbart once said, ‘If Hitler’s alive, I hope he’s out of town with a new musical.’ After reading your column, I feel Hitler might be working for the New York Post.”
Ha! Hit me with your best shots, Nathan.
But remember: I have a column. You don’t.

Broderick, Lane rule Broadway again with ‘It’s Only a Play’

The boys still have it!

Matthew Broderick and Nathan Lane, starring this fall in Terrence McNally’s “It’s Only a Play,” are still box office gold.

The revival, which opens Oct. 9, has already raked in $5.5 million — the top earner, so far, of the fall. The production teams Broderick and Lane for the first time since 2005, when they headlined a feeble revival of Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple.”

They were Broadway’s reigning couple in 2001 in Mel Brooks’ smash “The Producers.” The day the show opened, the box office sold $3 million in tickets, a record that stood for two years until they rejoined the show in 2003 — and sold $3.5 million in a single day.

That $5.5 million is quite a haul for a non-musical, making Broderick and Lane members of a select club of performers whose names can sell out a show before opening night — Denzel Washington (“A Raisin in the Sun”), Daniel Craig (“Betrayal”), Julia Roberts (“Three Days of Rain”) and Hugh Jackman (“Back on Broadway”).

Jackman, by the way, has yet to hit Broderick-Lane levels with his show, “The River.” But it’s in a smaller theater (Circle in the Square) and the play, a London import, is obscure. Jackman will no doubt set box office records of his own once the season comes into sharper focus. He always does.

Jack O’Brien, who’s directing “It’s Only a Play,” has assembled an impressive group around Broderick and Lane. Megan Mullally plays a novice producer, eagerly awaiting the reviews of her first show. Stockard Channing plays the nutty diva. And F. Murray Abraham plays a waspish critic, modeled, some think, on John Simon.

Broderick is the playwright, and Lane plays his best friend, a bitchy TV star who has pointed words for, as Elaine Stritch used to say, “the theater and the charming people in it.”

“It’s Only a Play” premiered in 1982, so only a handful of people today would get all the many jabs at the theater people of the time. That’s why McNally spent the spring updating the script, adding what my sources say are “sharp and hilarious” pokes at the current crop of theater muckety-mucks. His targets this time include Harvey Fierstein, Jujamcyn chief Jordan Roth and his mother, Daryl (a producer), Rosie O’Donnell and Big Ben Brantley.

Yours truly comes in for a fair share of cracks, I’m told — most of them delivered by Lane, who even ad-libbed a few at a recent table reading.

It brings back fond memories of the e-mail exchanges we had when I had a go at “The Addams Family” during its out-of-town tryout. Lane responded: “Larry Gelbart once said, ‘If Hitler’s alive, I hope he’s out of town with a new musical.’ After reading your column, I feel Hitler might be working for the New York Post.”

Ha! Hit me with your best shots, Nathan.

But remember: I have a column. You don’t.

Reblog - Posted 1 day ago with 8 notes
RUPERT ABOUT ‘IT’S ONLY A PLAY’

RG.us: Ah, that’s good to hear. So, next is… Broadway?
Rupert: Yeah, I know. Terrifying.
RG.us: You’re terrified?
Rupert: But… Yeah, I am, a little bit, but also really excited. Cause it’s just such an amazing cast and I’ve always wanted to, since Mojo, which was really fun, and now I’ve had a taste of the stage, to go to Broadway and see what that’s like and, yeah, it’s just feels like everything there is on a bigger scale. Kind of bigger theatres, it’s just, it all seems a bit more bigger. But yeah, it’s going to be a new challenge. Yeah, I’m really looking forward to it.
RG.us: Yeah, so are we. We were really excited when we got the news.
Rupert: Hmmm.
RG.us: And what are you most looking forward to doing the play?
Rupert: Erm, I don’t know exactly, I mean I’m kind of in that weird limbo that I don’t really know what to expect yet, but I think, yeah, I think just being on that stage with amazing people, like Stockard Channing, who is originally from Greece, she’s a bit of a hero of mine. So, yeah, that’s exciting, and yeah, just being on stage again, I got a really buzz off Mojo, and I’m kind of thirsty to get that feeling again.
RG.us: To get the buzz from…
Rupert: Yeah.

RG.us: Did you learn anything from Mojo that you’re going to be able to use for It’s Only A Play?
Rupert: Yeah, I think I did. I think I did, I mean, I kind of used it as education. You learn so much being on stage, kind of your… the other actors and, erm, it’s such a different kind of form of acting and I think that, just being so out of your comfort zone kind of pushes you to try new things and, yeah, I think it was a really great experience for me and I’m excited to do that again.
RG.us: Yeah, that’s pretty cool. And do you already know what kind of accent you’ll be doing? If you’re going to be American?
Rupert: Well, that’s the scary thing, I’m not sure – I’m not American, no, my character is English. But it’s a very different character to what I’ve played, er, what I’ve ever played. It’s not… it’s not really a likeable character. He’s a bit of a… a bit of an arsehole. *laughs*
RG.us: So you’re finally getting to play the bad guy?
Rupert: Yeah, kind of. So yeah, I’m excited to try something like that, it really is kind of new ground for me, so I’m really excited about that.
RG.us: Yeah, and we…
Rupert: …and I think it’ll be fun.
RG.us: Yeah, and we’re definitely excited about seeing it!
Rupert: Yeah, come and see it!

RG.us: How did that come about, It’s Only A Play? Did you go to a casting, or did they contact you?
Rupert: Yeah, no, it kind of just… I was… it kind of happened really quickly. I was in the middle of Moonwalkers and yeah, I just kind of got a call and got sent the script and Skype’d with Jack O’Brian, the director, who’s amazing, so I’m just really surprised that I got the part. So yeah, I’m really looking forward to it and it’s going to be good fun.
RG.us: And did he see you in Mojo, or how did that happen?
Rupert: Err, I’m not sure, actually. I’m not sure how it all kind of happened, but yeah, it definitely was good to have that experience from Mojo, cause I mean, like, two years ago I wouldn’t have dreamed of ever going near Broadway.
RG.us: Yeah!
Rupert: Or a play at West End or along that way, yeah. It kind of gave me a confidence boost and it has really kind of helped me. And I’m scared, but excited.
RG.us: Yeah, and we’re definitely excited for you, and we’re looking forward to seeing you there.
Rupert: Brilliant, yeah.

SOURCE

Reblog - Posted 1 week ago with 28 notes

ER-MY-NEE

Reblog - Posted 1 week ago with 395 notes
tagged as → #romione

Because, unlike JK Rowling, I find - owning up to your mistake and coming back - a by far more defining trait of Ronald Weasley than him actually leaving in the first place.
(ps.: that shittastic interview can still burn in hell for me.)

Because, unlike JK Rowling, I find - owning up to your mistake and coming back - a by far more defining trait of Ronald Weasley than him actually leaving in the first place.

(ps.: that shittastic interview can still burn in hell for me.)

Reblog - Posted 1 week ago with 50 notes
Reblog - Posted 1 week ago with 347 notes
tagged as → #romione #looks

off-in-lala-land:

frokenfilm:

Helena Bonham-Carter in A Room with a View

#hermione granger tho


"Miss him?", said Harry. "I don’t miss him. But that was a downright lie. Harry liked Hermione very much but she just wasn’t the same as Ron.
“Ron’s ears turned bright red and he become engrossed in a tuft of grass at his feet, which he prodded with his toe ‘he must’ve known I’d run out on you’. 'No', Harry corrected him, 'He must've known you'd always want to come back. 

"Miss him?", said Harry. "I don’t miss him. But that was a downright lie. Harry liked Hermione very much but she just wasn’t the same as Ron.

“Ron’s ears turned bright red and he become engrossed in a tuft of grass at his feet, which he prodded with his toe ‘he must’ve known I’d run out on you’. 'No', Harry corrected him, 'He must've known you'd always want to come back. 

Reblog - Posted 1 week ago with 82 notes